Shapeways 3D Printspiration

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Learn to Design for 3D Printing in NYC

If you want to learn how to get started designing for 3D printing we are running an introductory class in New York City on Thursday the 14th of February, 2013.  The class is suitable for anyone, of any age who is interested in getting started 3D printing.

The Intro to Design for 3D Printing class will cover the basic principles behind design for 3D printing, the free tools available to get started and the materials and processes used to make your ideas real.  Bring your Mac or PC laptop your charger, and an external mouse and create an account on Shapeways prior to the event and download free 3D modeling software 123D Design from Autodesk prior to the class so we can run through some of the basic tools, and maybe even design a little something. 

Sign up via Skillshare and be sure to bring your laptop and mouse.

Design for 3D Printing 101: Intro to Design for 3D Printing

When you are designing for 3D print there are two main factors that you really need to take into account before you start.

  1. What application to design with
  2. What material you are designing for

In this first introductory session we are going to look at choosing the right type 3D modeling software.

There are now many 3D modeling applications you can use to 3D model your designs to 3D Print, ranging from very expensive professional engineering software, through to free online tools to get you started. Choosing the right software is an important first step in ensuring you can realize your ideas with 3D printing.

Read more on the Shapeways Blog

suziam:

I made a new ring! This one is a classic design, a simple banded ring in silver. Naturally ordered from Shapeways.

It’s now in the store, and I share the ‘behind-the-scenes’ process in my blog post here:
http://owlposse.com/blog/2012/09/3d-printing-know-how/ 

Design with SimulationXpress (VIDEO)

3D Modeler for Hire vs 3D Modeler Needed : Design for 3D Print When You Can’t Design for 3D Print

Many people want to 3D Print their ideas with Shapeways but do not (yet) know how to 3D model their designs. Luckily, at the same time there are thousands of incredibly talented 3D modelers in the Shapeways community, some of whom are offering their 3D modeling services for hire to help those people make their ideas for real with 3D Printing.

We have seen some AMAZING products come to life thanks to these connections made on Shapeways from Siri to shoes (many shoes), trophies for bad sportsmanship, skateboarding elephants, Bronies and Hybride sculptures, whether starting from sketch, fixing an existing model or creative collaboration it is a great way for modelers to stretch their skills and help others 3D print ideas.

If you, as a 3D modeler want to offer your 3D modeling services on the forum post the following details in the forum:  

About me:
Expertise:
Experience:
Portfolio:

Pay Rate:

Note: Please use your own discretion when entering into agreements with other users. Shapeways is not liable for any transactions that take place between users in the forum, we just want to make it easier for you to find each other.

If you have an idea for something you want to 3D Print but do not know how to 3D model, or if you have a 3D model that needs some love to make it 3D printable, you can either post your project in the 3D modeler needed forum or take a look at designers offering 3D modeling services to find the right person to help you out.

Again, Shapeways is not liable for any transactions that take place between users in the forum, we just want to help you get started 3D Printing.

If you want to learn to design for 3D Printing, take a look at our tutorials page, play with one of the easy creators developed by Shapeways and our friends or take a class in the Shapeways Skillshare School…. 

Learn to Design for 3D Printing with Shapeways: More Classes in NYC

If you want to learn to Design for 3D Printing and you are in NYC then we have a range of classes to get you started over the next couple of weeks. Come along and try your hand at making your ideas for real with 3D printing in a relaxed, friendly environment..

Squishy Football 3D-Printing Workshop for Beginners

Taught by Kevin Wei

Wed, Jul 25th, 2012

7:00 pm

Modeling for 3D Printing with Shapeways

Taught by Aaron Trocola

Mon, Jul 30th, 2012

7:00 pm

Frisbee 3D-Printing Workshop for Beginners

Taught by Kevin Wei

Tue, Jul 31st, 2012

7:00 pm

Intro to Design for 3D Printing with Shapeways

Taught by Duann Scott

Wed, Aug 1st, 2012

7:00pm

(via Shapeways | blog: 3D Printing Technologies Explained)

At Shapeways we use a range of different 3D printing technologies to create your 3D prints depending on the material you choose. We use terms like White Strong & Flexible, Frosted Ultra Detail and Full Color Sandstone to describe the material properties, not the process or material brand name so that people with no experience can better choose the materials to use for 3D printing. On the materials page you can dig in to get more detail on the materials and processes used to have a deeper understanding. 

Shapeways co-founder and Chief Technology Officer Robert Schouwenburg has a personal blog he uses to keep track of his thoughts on 3D printing, online creation & personal fabrication which is a great source of information.  We will occasionally ‘reblog’ his posts as they are a great resource and offer insight into some of the thinking behind Shapeways. The first we would like to post is 3D Printing Technologies Explained which, ahh, explains some of the current 3D printing technologies.

The rest of this blog post will be a direct copy of Robert’s post from July 21st 2011.

In this post, I would like to give an overview of the 3D printing technologies which exist today. Each of these technologies deserves a blog post on its own, but I want to start with an overview.

While writing this – long – blog post, I realized that I needed to introduce some concepts first before I explained the specifics of each of the technologies.

  • Build platform – platform on which the parts are build. Just imagine a plate which can be lowered and raised.
  • Build chamber – chamber in where the 3D printing takes place. It consists of the build platform, heads / laser or projectors, the material distribution and depositing mechanisms.
  • Layers – 3D printers build parts in layers which are stacked on top of each other. In most cases, you can recognize the layering when examining a 3D printed part.
  • Support structures – structures to help the printing process. The structures support overhangs while printing making sure the part does not collapse on itself during printing.
  • Support material – special material for making support structures. The reasons to use a different material is that it is easier to remove and recognize during cleaning of the part.

SLA – Stereolithography Aparatus
This is the oldest commercial 3D printing technology invented by Chuck Hull in 1984 and commercialized by founding 3D systems in 1986. The printing works by having laser solidifying a liquid resin in a VAT on a build platform. The next layer is added by lowering the build platform inside the VAT. After printing, the part is cleaned in a chemical bath, and cured in an UV oven. This technology needs support structures.
A variation of this technology uses DLP (Digital Light Processors) instead of a laser to cure the resin. This makes the printing process go faster.
SLA systems are manufactured by 3D Systems, Envisiontec (DLP) and ZCorp (DLP)
For more information see this excellent Wikpedia article.

SLS – Selective Laser Sintering
This technology was invented by Dr. Carl Deckard around the same time as SLA. The process is essentially fusing small particles in powder form together using a laser. Just below the powder this is a build platform which lowers to make room for the next layer. A wiper redistributes the powder over the platform, and the next layer is fused by the laser. This technology does need support material or structures. The powder functions as a support.
Using SLS several types of plastic, metal and ceramic/sand powders can be used.
SLS systems are sold by EOS and 3D Systems.
For more information see this Wikipedia article,

FDM – Fused Deposition modeling
Scott Crump invented FDM in the late 80s and commercialized it through his company Stratasys in 1990. FDM printing works by extruding a material through a nozzle and move the nozzle over a build platform to “write” the part. The next layer is added by lowering the build platform. Support structures or materials are necessary for this technology, but not all manufacturers offer that option and thus limiting the usefulness of their FDM systems.
Common materials are plastics, but other compound materials are used as well. FDM technology is employed by many low cost hobbyist printers.
FDM systems are sold by Stratasys, Makerbot, UP!, Fab@Home and others.
For more information see Wikipedia

3DP – Three Dimensional Printing
This technology came out of MIT and was invented in 1993. It is commercialized by Z Corporation, but others use the same technology, as well. 3DP uses a powder as well in the printing process. The powder is “glued” together by binder on a build platform. The binder is deposited by a moving head. The next layer is added by lowering the build platform. A wiper redistributes the powder. The powder acts as support, so this technology does not need any support structures or material. The parts are extremely fragile after printing and need to be carefully cleaned and cured.
There is a wide range of options for powder and ranges from plaster, ceramics, metals to glass. Unique to the commercial application of Z Corporation is the ability to color the parts during printing resulting in parts delivered in full color.
3DP systems are manufactured by Z Corporation, ExOne and Voxeljet.
For more information please see the 3DP page at MIT.

Polyjet matrix printing
This technology is specific for Objet Geometries. The process builds parts by extruding or jets extremely small droplets of material onto a build platform. The head can drop multiple droplets at the same time – hence the name matrix. After depositing, the material is cured using UV light. The next layer is deposited on top of the previous layer. This technology uses support material during building.
The material used in this process is a polymer. Unique to this process is that it can use two distinct materials to build a part including mixing these two materials in different variations.
Polyjet matrix systems are manufactured by Objet.
For more information see Wikipedia.

EBM – Electronic Beam Melting
This printing process is developed by Arcam which was founded in 1997. This process uses a powder which is fused together on a build platform by an electronic beam. By lowering the build platform and redistributing the powder using a wiper, the next layer can be build. The process is similar to SLS but uses an electronic beam instead of a laser.
The powders are always metals with different types of alloys. The build chamber is a vacuum and heats up until 700 – 1000C.
EBM systems are manufactured by Arcam
For more information see the EBM Wikipedia page

LOM – Laminated Object Manufacturing
This technology is developed by Helisys. it uses thin sheets of material which is cut by either a laser or a knife according to the outline of the part. Next the sheet is glued on top of the previous cut sheet of material. After printing the excess material is “broken” off and you are left with the printed parts.
LOM printers mostly use paper, but there are also other materials – mostly various plastics.
LOM systems are today only manufactured by Mcor technologies.
For more information see this – somewhat sparse – Wikipedia article.

These are the most 3D printing technologies manufactured today. There are more technologies and variations available in both research and production, but they focus on real niche areas.

Image = 3D printers / Tom Taylor / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

We have thousands upon thousands of amazing products for sale in the Shapeways shops designed by the Shapeways community. We are always on the lookout for great products to put on our home page, to share with journalists and take to events to promote the amazing quality and breadth of items designed by you. For us to promote your designs it is essential that you have high quality photographs that properly capture your designs. (via Shapeways | blog: How to Get Your Designs Promoted by Shapeways)

How to Paint Shapeways 3D Printed White Strong and Flexible: Method: 1. Immerse in acrylic floor sealant (using tweezers is a good idea). Take out, store nose down to let it dry for 4 hours. Takes 30 secs. 2. Use coarse brush dipped in turps to clean off over-accumulation on wing leading edges, etc. Takes 20 secs. 3. Repeat steps 1 & 2 4. Let dry overnight. 5. Paint in your favourite method. I use overall linen, then paint over that. 6. Use gloss varnish to give decals a good surface to stick on. 7. Put on decals. A thin coat of 3:1 PVA glue/water may help them adhere. (That Morane fuselage decal needed it!) 8. Dullcote 24 hours later.

Shapeways | blog: How to Patina 3D Printed Silver & Experiments for Stainless Steel

Shapeways community member Erckgillis has shared some great tips on how to patina 3D printed Silver using Liver of Sulfur, along with some patina processes for other metals.

Patinating Silver

While Liver of Sulfur is usually used to form a black or gray patina on silver, there are a number of intermediate interference colors formed, especially if a weak solution is used. These include yellow, reddish brown, purple and blue. Some people recommend adding a small amount of household ammonia to the solution claiming it intensifies the lovely blue-green-red-purple interference colors one gets when using a dilute solution and slow approach. These pretty colors are not very stable over time because they continue to react with sulfur in the air and darken. You can sometimes ‘save’ them by spraying a lacquer over them. They may be retained if the surface is properly sealed. Acrylic resin is the recommended sealer for durability and resistance to darkening in light. Some jeweler’s lacquers also work. Envirotex® works very well for this.

Using Liver of Sulfur on Silver

1.Take a piece of Liver of Sulfur, about the size of your finger nail, and dissolve it in a cup or more of warm water.

2.Heat the piece of metal to be treated and then dip in the Liver of Sulfur solution.

3.Rinse in water after each dip. While Liver of Sulfur is usually used to obtain gray and black colors on silver, there are a number of intermediate interference colors formed, especially if a weak solution is used. These include yellow, reddish brown, purple and blue. Some people recommend adding a small amount of household ammonia to the solution claiming it intensifies the lovely blue-green-red-purple interference colors one gets when using a dilute solution and slow approach. These pretty colors are not very stable over time because they continue to react with sulfur in the air and darken. You can sometimes ‘save’ them by spraying an appropriate lacquer over them. They may be retained if the surface is properly sealed. Acrylic resin is the recommended sealer for durability and resistance to darkening in light. Some jeweler’s lacquers also work. Envirotex® works very well for this.

4.The piece may be sanded lightly and polished. Raised areas will show the original color of the metal, recessed areas will remained blackened.

5.Be sure to wear gloves and protective clothing when working with Liver of Sulfur. The fumes are dangerous and it should be used with good ventilation and covered right after use. It must not be allowed to come in contact with acids as a toxic gas is then rapidly evolved.

Patinating Copper (experiments for 3D Printed Stainless Steel)

Following are techniques for Patinating Copper (Brass and Bronze are copper alloys), because of the bronze content of Shapeways 3D printed stainless steel (up to 30%) you may be able to get some success with the following techniques. If you do experiment with these processes please do share your results, we would love to see the results.

Deep Red Patina

1. Clean both sides of your metal under running water with a wet-and-dry paper towel.

2. Paste both sides with a flux paste – either borax flux, or a powder flux.

3. Heat the copper on one side until it glows orange. Turn it over and heat the other side to the same color. Then quench it in water and pickle for a few minutes.

4. The copper should be a beautiful red-purple color. If it is not, simply repeat.

5. Gently polish or lightly oil the copper with either jade oil or soft beeswax.

Blue Patina

1. Fill a small saucer with household ammonia.

2. Cover the copper salt.

3. Dampen the salt with water or vinegar.

4. Place the copper and the saucer with the ammonia with in an airtight container.

5. Allow the copper to sit for several hours to several days. Remove when the desired coloration is reached.

Green-Blue Patina

1. Fill a sealable plastic container with either sawdust or tobacco.

2. Add enough of the following solution, one part vinegar to three parts household ammonia, to just dampen your sawdust.

3. Clean your copper by annealing, pickling, and running under water. Let dry.

4. Place the copper in the sawdust mixture and cover completely. Seal the container and leave for at least one hour to several days until the desire finish is reached.

Black Patina

1. Take a piece of Liver of Sulfur, about the size of your finger nail, and dissolve it in a cup or more of warm water.

2. Heat the piece of metal to be treated and then dip in the Liver of Sulfur solution.

3. Rinse in water after each dip until you reach your final desired color.

4. The piece may be sanded lightly and polished. Raised areas will show the original color of the metal, recessed areas will remained blackened.

5. Be sure to wear gloves and protective clothing when working with Liver of Sulfur. The fumes are dangerous and it should be used with good ventilation and covered right after use. It must not be allowed to come in contact with acids as a toxic gas is then rapidly evolved. 

Reference: The Jeweler’s Directory of Decorative Finishes, From Enameling and Engraving to Inlay and Granulation By Jinks McGrath

For those of you who have tried the Shapeways Creators, made your own Ringpoem, drawn your own earrings, experimented with the Image Popper and are ready to start designing your own items from scratch, we are holding a workshop just for you: Design for 3D Printing with Shapeways: Tue, Sep 13th, New York City.

We’re on the edge of a new normal, where everyday products are custom made for and by each and every one of us. Today, only a lucky few know how to design the digital models that become 3d printed objects. If you haven’t known where to start, this class will get you on the path to printing a stradivarius in no time.

In this beginner’s class, we’ll take you from basic design concepts in SketchUp (Google’s free 3D modeling software) to customizing your own case for the iPhone 4, to uploading it and placing an order to get it 3D printed on Shapeways. A $25 voucher will be included for all students to cover the cost of printing.

Bring your Mac or PC laptop (SketchUp does not support Linux), your charger, and an external mouse. We do recommend that you create an account on Shapeways and download Google SketchUp prior to the class.

Sign up via Skill Share, the course will be run by Aaron Trocola aka Aeron203, an industrial designer who has been creating 3D designs and working with technology start-up companies for over 15 years.

Turn your 3D model into a full color 3D object! Shapeways Full Color 3D printing service makes it possible. This video shows the production process, and a number of inspiring examples. See the gallery for more designs by our community: http://www.shapeways.com/gallery